ConFusion 2018: The Setting as Character

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

THE PANEL: The Setting as Character (21 January 2018, 12:00)

DESCRIPTION: “In Science Fiction and Fantasy , settings can literally come alive–be it via the talking flowers of Through The Looking Glass or the rage of Peter Quill’s creepy dad-planet in Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2. In Ann Leckie’s Imperial Radch universe where ships have minds, main characters can be both people and places at the same time. Are living settings a science fiction/fantasy extension of the classic “Hero Vs. Nature” story? How do they exist in conversation with real-world beliefs about whether the world around us has a will of its own?”

PANELISTS: A. T. Greenblatt, Cassandra Morgan, David John Baker, Suzanne Church

NOTES:

My thoughts:

This was a good general overview of the topic. I was kind of hoping that there would be more focus on concepts like Genius Loci and the like, but on reflection the panel’s approach makes more sense, as setting qua setting is the environment in which the story exists, not a personality with agency per se.

ConFusion 2018: Science Fiction and Philosophy

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

PANEL: “Science Fiction and Philosophy: Exploring the Connections”

DESCRIPTION: “SF has been called the literature of ideas, and the ideas explored in SF have become increasingly philosophical throughout the history of the genre. What are the most illuminating thought experiments in recent and classic SF? Which philosophical questions do they raise? And how are philosophers in today’s universities employing SF in their teaching and research?”

PANELISTS: Andrea Johnson, Dyrk Ashton, Ken Schrader, Nathan Rockwood

NOTES:

MY THOUGHTS:

This panel was interesting in that so much of the discussion revolved around listing works which address philosophical questions, and not a lot of addressing the questions themselves. This bothered me at first, but on reflection I realize that these panels are meant to be introductions and overviews, not necessarily deep dives into the subject; if for no other reason than that the panels all stand alone, and if two or more share a subject it is only by coincidence. That said, I appreciated the breadth of suggestions, and particularly that they included games. Computer games, if the narrative is sufficiently complex, can be seen as simulations and testing grounds for ideas which are not always easy for an individual to address in the real world.

ConFusion 2018: Immigration and Refuge in Science Fiction

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

PANEL: Immigration and Refuge in Science Fiction (20 January 2018, 10:00)

DESCRIPTION: “Travel stories are classics in any genre, but in science fiction stories of travelling to a new home are often about colonization, or about intrepid explorers amongst the (primitive) aliens. Let’s talk about the science fiction stories that better reflect the experiences of immigrants and refugees in the real world.”

PANELISTS: Alexandra Manglis, Amal El-Mohtar, David Anthony Durham, John Chu

NOTES:

My thoughts:

There were many important ideas passed around in this panel, particularly in light of the racist, xenophobic, fascist policies of the current (c. 2018) U.S. president and his cabinet. One book which comes to mind which showed the POV of a refugee is What is the What, by Dave Eggers. Neither genre nor quite fiction, but a beautiful book all the same. As for fiction stories, well, I can’t think of any I have read. Not that they are not out there.

ConFusion 2018: Visions of Positive Masculinity

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

DESCRIPTION: From high fantasy adventures to noir mysteries to superheroes and war stories , genre fiction has meticulously catalogued the narrow roles society expects men to occupy: strong, brave, and powerful, but also angry, competitive, emotionally repressed, and misogynistic. What does a character arc look like for the man who has decided not to be the best at performing this toxic vision of masculinity? We’ve seen many stories about women who struggle and triumph against gender roles. How can writers use social expectations of masculinity to create challenges that their male characters have to overcome to save the day?

PANELISTS: David Anthony Durham, Jason Sanford, Jim C. Hines, John Chu, Pablo Defendini

NOTES:

  • Before discussing “positive masculinity”, perhaps a definition of “toxic masculinity” (“T.M.” henceforth)?
  • T.M. may appear in ways that seem innocuous
  • T.M. does NOT mean “All men are bastards!”
  • T.M. is something we are born into but can supersede
  • #NotAllMen is a symptom of T.M.
  • Kylo Ren is an example of T.M.
  • Poe Dameron is an example of a different sort of T.M.
  • We are at the beginning of the pushback against T.M. at the institutional level.
  • Part of challenging T.M. is challenging the idea of “masculinity”, i.g. “What is masculinity? What is masculine?”
  • Works which stand against T.M.:
  • Empathy can inoculate against T.M.
  • Good fiction creates empathy
    • “Write better books, make better people”
  • Can healthy, well-balanced protagonists make for compelling reading? YES!!!!!
  • We would like to see aspects of T.M. addressed in literature in the upcoming year:
    • Aggression
    • Conquest
    • Lack of empathy
  • “We want people to live up to Apple’s P.R., not necessarily Apple’s actions in the world.”
  • Big tech companies are often not aware of, or don’t care about, even the first-order effects of their actions (e.g. externalities, be they environmental, cultural, economic, et al.)
  • Being proud of ignorance is a huge signifier of T.M. Distrust of expertise and education and intelligence
  • Dismantling T.M. is MEN’s PROBLEM. It’s not on women to do it for men.

My thoughts:

This was quite eye-opening for me. I am aware of the existence of toxic masculinity in everyday life, and do what I can to expunge it from my personality and social interactions. Of course, as a guy, and as me being embedded in me, I am not always aware of how I am perceived by people outside of me. This panel was a good view into the various ways toxic masculinity can manifest. Of particular interest was that this panel happened right after an incident in another panel, which led to an attendee exhibiting stalker-ish behavior toward one of the panelists. T.M. in action. I expect I will add thoughts to this subject in future blog posts.

ConFusion 2018: How a Manuscript Becomes a Book

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

PANEL: How a Manuscript Become a Book (19 January 2018, 14:00)

PANEL DESCRIPTION: “‘I’m just an MS…sittin’ here on an editor’s desk…I hope and pray to be a book someday, but today I am just an MS!’ There’s plenty of information on the web about how to write and sell a manuscript , but the process after the deal is signed is often opaque to new writers. We’ll walk through the steps a manuscript typically goes through between deal day and launch day, and what authors can do to help the process go smoothly.”

PANELISTS: Cherie M. Priest, Navah Wolfe, Patrick Nielsen Hayden, Richard Shealy, Yanni Kuznia

NOTES

  • On acceptance: It has to be a great book THAT THE PUBLISHER KNOWS WHAT TO DO WITH (Navah Wolfe)
  • You never learn to write A NOVEL. You learn to write THIS NOVEL. The same goes for editing.
  • Pointing out places that need fixing vs. recommending specific fixes. “This isn’t working” vs. “Maybe try this”
  • When the editors do their job well, you don’t notice them
  • “Junicode” (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junicode) variation of Garamond with loads of diacritics. Created to fill a need in academic publishing
  • “First pass” == “Uncorrected Proof” == “Galley”

My thoughts:

I mostly attended this panel as a sanity check to see if the rest of the publishing world did things similarly to how I did them. Therefore, for me, this panels was more about affirming than learning. Everything discussed jibed with my experiences as publisher and editor at Caffeinated Press. The notes collected here are the “aha!” moments of the panel.

ConFusion 2018: The Care and Feeding of the Subject Expert

(These are my lightly edited notes for a panel I attended at the ConFusion Fantasy and Science Fiction Convention in January of 2018)

PANEL: The Care and Feeding of the Subject Expert (19 January 2018, 12:00)

PANEL DESCRIPTION: “Writing science fiction and fantasy requires a ton of research. Having the internet at our fingertips makes it easier than it used to be, but sometimes we need to ask an expert. Many folks are delighted to geek out about their specialties, but we still need to do due diligence, respect their time, and make sure we’re asking the right questions. How do you find qualified experts? Do you approach them with prepared questions? When is it ethical to pick someone’s brain for free, and when should you insist on compensating your expert?”

PANELISTS: Marissa Lingen, Michael Kucharski, Monica Valentinelli, Patrick S. Tomlinson, Teresa Nielsen Hayden

NOTES

  • Sources at the start of a project are different from sources at the end of a project
  • Non-geek subject experts love it when writers take the time to get it right.
  • Being wrong is the best way to find an expert on the subject. When inaccuracies find their way into print the critics come out of the woodwork
  • A specific detail is an opportunity for your reader to argue with you. Don’t get it wrong
  • Is that particular specificity necessary?
  • Specificity can turn a work of fiction into a period piece. Accurate details (e.g. the price of things) can pinpoint stories in a particular time and place
  • We aren’t building worlds; we are building simulation of worlds. Therefore don’t add too much weight. Do specificity and detail in service of the story
  • SME can provide a sanity check. As in, is this right to the level of detail necessary to be meaningful to the story?
  • [Nature has a sci-fi section?]
  • How to reward/pay a SME: coffee, acknowledgement in print, dinner, money, Tuckerization
  • Wikipedia is a door, not a destination. The sources in a wikipedia article are the STARTING point for research.
  • [Mention of Jonathan Israel as SME for loads of European stuff]
  • If the SME’s response to a question is “it’s complicated,” it is a good indication that this person is, in fact, an SME. A facile or immediate and simple answer is not necessarily a well-thought-out answer
  • People who are weary about a subject are more likely to be experts than are the people who are excited.
  • “Englishing” – turning a translated text into a “regular English” text – is a Paid Thing

My thoughts:

I like the idea that subject matter experts may well be jaded about the subject in which they have expertise. It rings true. Not jaded in the sense that they find it boring; rather that the magic has become the mundane and they have integrated their knowledge into their lives and world-views. Being an expert in a subject doesn’t mean that you can simply recite dry facts.

The Record of My Life

I have just added a “Published Work” page to this blog. You can access it through the main menu. It’s kind of threadbare at the moment, but with a little luck I will have some publications to add by the end of the year.

Most of my published work at present consists of editorials written for The 3288 Review, and around three dozen interviews with contributors to The 3288 Review.

ConFusion 2018

I will be speaking on two panels at ConFusion 2018! Here is my schedule:

TITLE: Poetry in Novels
DESCRIPTION: Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass include lengthy poems, placing them in a long tradition of long-form fiction that incorporates poetry into the work. How does writing poems for prose fiction differ from writing poems that stand alone? What distinct techniques does it require? Where do poems within stories exist in the landscape of genre poetry today?
PANELISTS: Amal El-Mohtar, Clif Flynt, Jeff Pryor, Josef Matulich, John Winkelman, Mari Ness
ROOM: Isle Royale
DAY/TIME: Sunday, January 21, 10:00 – 10:50 am

TITLE: Analogue Media in the Digital Age
DESCRIPTION: Paper, vinyl, and film, oh my! What are the unique advantages to analogue media, and what’s just a deeply ingrained sense of how media “should” be? Is it not a book without the paper smell, or a song without the soft crackle of a needle on vinyl?
PANELISTS: David Klecha, Gail Cross, John Winkelman
ROOM: Petoskey
DAY/TIME: Sunday, January 21, 1:00 – 1:50 pm

I will, of course, vastly over-think and over-research these topics over the next ten days, and will therefore post my notes.

2018 Reading List

Welcome to the fourth year of the Reading List. These are all of the books I have purchased and/or read in calendar year 2018. My full list of books can be found on LibraryThing (books I own) and GoodReads (books I have read).

January

  1. McKean, Dave and Schafer, William – The Weight of Words (Subterranean Press)
  2. Nguyen, Viet ThanThe Refugees
  3. Atwood, MargaretThe Handmaid’s Tale
  4. Walton, DavidThe Genius Plague
  5. Sterling, PhillipAnd Then Snow (Main Street Rag)
  6. Mitchell, DavidSlade House
  7. Peninsula Poets #74.1, Spring 2017 (Poetry Society of Michigan)
  8. Peninsula Poets #74.2, Fall 2017 (Poetry Society of Michigan)
  9. D’Rivera, PaquitoLetters to Yeyito (Restless Books)
  10. Simo, AnaHeartland (Restless Books)
  11. Khan, Ausma Zehanat – The Bloodprint
  12. Liu, KenThe Man who Ended History, signed, #462 of 500 (WSFA Press)
  13. Chakraborty, S.A.The City of Brass
  14. Ashton, DyrkPaternus
  15. Hines, Jim C.Terminal Alliance
  16. Law, Lucas K. and Mak, Derwin (eds.) – Where the Stars Shine (Laksa Media Groups, Inc)
  17. Tomlinson, Patrick S.The Ark (Angry Robot Books)
  18. Tomlinson, Patrick S.Trident’s Forge (Angry Robot Books)
  19. Tomlinson, Patrick S.Children of the Divide (Angry Robot Books)
  20. Sizemore, JasonFor Exposure (Apex Publications)
  21. Sizemore, JasonIrredeemable (Seventh Star Press)
  22. Apex Magazine #104
  23. Gates, Jaym and Valentinelli, Monica (eds.) – Upside Down (Apex Publications)
  24. Townsend, TracyThe Nine (Prometheus Books)
  25. Ness, MariThrough Immortal Shadows Singing (Papaveria Press)
  26. Wolfe, Navah and Parisien, Dominik (eds.) – Robots vs. Fairies (Saga Press)
  27. Hirshfield, JaneNine Gates
  28. Brown, Adrienne Marie and Imarisha, Walidah (eds.) – Octavia’s Brood (AK Press)
  29. Karastoyanov, HristoThe Same Night Awaits Us All (Open Letter Books)
  30. Music & Literature #7
  31. Music & Literature #8
  32. Freedman, Carl (ed.) – Conversations with Ursula K. Le Guin (University Press of Mississippi)
  33. Le Guin, Ursula K.The Found and the Lost (Saga Press)
  34. Le Guin, Ursula K.The Unreal and the Real (Saga Press)
  35. Foglio, Kaja and Foglio, PhilGirl Genius 16: The Incorruptible Library (Airship Entertainment)
  36. Claybourne, Zig ZagThe Brothers Jetstream: Leviathan (Narmer’s Palette)
  37. Eastern Iowa Review #3
  38. Johns, AndreasBaba Yaga (Peter Lang Publishing)

February

  1. Granta #142
  2. Stein, MelissaTerrible Blooms (Copper Canyon Press)
  3. George, JennyThe Dream of Reason (Copper Canyon Press)
  4. Nezhukumatathil, AimeeOceanic (Copper Canyon Press)
  5. Campbell, Bill and Hall, Edward Austin (eds) – Mothership: Tales From Afrofuturism and Beyond (Rosarium Publishing)
  6. Goh, Jaymee and Chng, Joyce (eds) – The Sea is Ours: Tales of Steampunk Southeast Asia (Rosarium Publishing)
  7. Karetnyk, Bryan (ed.) – Russian Émigré Short Stories from Bunin to Yanovsky
  8. Triantafyllou, Petros (ed.) – Art of War (Booknest.eu)
  9. Jemisin, N.K.The Obelisk Gate
  10. VanderMeer, JeffAuthority
  11. Jacobin Magazine, Issue 28 (Winter 2018)
  12. Nielsen, MadameThe Endless Summer (Open Letter Books)
  13. Kopf, AliciaBrother in Ice (And Other Stories)

March

  1. Okorafor, NnediBinti
  2. Sullivan, Susan AbelCursed: Wickedly Fun Stories (World Weaver Press)
  3. Parrish, Rhonda (ed.) – Fae (World Weaver Press)
  4. Parrish, Rhonda (ed.) – Sirens (World Weaver Press)
  5. Parrish, Rhonda (ed.) – Equus (World Weaver Press)
  6. Parrish, Rhonda (ed.) – Corvidae (World Weaver Press)
  7. Bujold, Lois McMasterPenric’s Mission, signed, #433 of 450 (Subterranean Press)
  8. Mandel, Emily St. JohnStation Eleven, signed, #588 or 750 (Subterranean Press)
  9. Reaves, Mallory and Reaves, MichaelEternity’s Wheel, signed, #485 of 500 (Subterranean Press)
  10. Armstrong, KelleyLost Souls (Subterranean Press)
  11. Blaylock, James P.River’s Edge, signed, #970 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  12. Silverberg, RobertThe Millennium Express (Subterranean Press)
  13. Spencer, William BrowningThe Unorthodox Dr. Draper, signed, #382 of 750 (Subterranean Press)
  14. Straub, PeterPerdido (Subterranean Press)
  15. Silverberg, RobertThe Emperor and the Maula (Subterranean Press)
  16. Shiner, LewisHeroes and Villains, signed, #436 of 750 (Subterranean Press)
  17. Lumley, BrianThe Compleat Crow (Subterranean Press)
  18. Pulphouse Fiction Magazine #0, December 2017
  19. Pulphouse Fiction Magazine #1, January 2018
  20. Schutt, ChristinePure Hollywood (And Other Stories)
  21. James, D.R.If God Were Gentle (Dos Madres Press)
  22. Bray, MarkAntifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook (Melville House Publishing)
  23. Kemper, DonnaForgive and Forgotten (Credo House Publishers)
  24. Apex Magazine #106 (March 2018)
  25. Joshi, S.T. (ed.) – Black Wings 6 (PS Publishing)

April

  1. Winn, HowardAcropolis (Propertius Press)
  2. Jemisin, N.K. – The Stone Sky
  3. Coates, Ta-NehisiA Nation Under Our Feet 1
  4. Brakefield, RussellField Recordings (Wayne State University Press)
  5. VanderMeer, Jeff – Acceptance
  6. Cleave, Sarah (ed.) – Banthology: Stories from Banned Nations (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  7. Ganieva, Alisa – Bride & Groom (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  8. Apex Magazine #107 (April 2018)
  9. Harris, Joseph – Logically Thinking (chapbook)
  10. Harris, Joseph – Speak Up! (chapbook)
  11. McSweeney’s #52
  12. Ugresic, DubravkaFox (Open Letter Books)
  13. Bat-Ami, Miriam – Measuring the Marigolds (Caffeinated Press)
  14. Ono, Masatsugu – Lion Cross Point (Two Lines Press)
  15. Two Lines #28
  16. Scalzi, John – Head On
  17. Willis, Connie – I Met a Traveler in an Antique Land (Subterranean Press)
  18. Lovecraft, H.P. – The Illustrated Call of Cthulhu (Flesk Publications)
  19. Mignola, Mike – Hellboy: Into the Silent Sea, Studio Edition (Flesk Publications)
  20. Peninsula Poets #75.1 (Spring 2018)
  21. Vodolazkin, EugeneLaurus (Oneworld Publications)

May

  1. Ward, Jesmyn (ed.) – The Fire This Time
  2. Vollmann, William T.No Immediate Danger
  3. Bacigalupi, PaoloThe Alchemist (Subterranean Press)
  4. Kuznia, Yanni (ed.) – A Fantasy Medley 3 (Subterranean Press)
  5. Hilbig, WolfgangThe Tidings of the Trees (Two Lines Press)
  6. Pulphouse Fiction Magazine #2, April 2018
  7. Mandanipour, ShahriarMoon Brow (Restless Books)
  8. Fresán, RodrigoThe Bottom of the Sky (Open Letter Books)

June

  1. Voices 2018
  2. Shishkin, MikhailCalligraphy Lessons (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  3. VanderMeer, Ann and VanderMeer, Jeff (eds) – Sisters of the Revolution (PM Press)
  4. Vollmann, William T.No Good Alternative
  5. Bulgakov, MikhailThe Master and Margarita
  6. Russian Literature Triquarterly #9 (Spring 1974)
  7. Carruth, HaydenScrambled Eggs & Whiskey (Copper Canyon Press)
  8. Le Guin, UrsulaSixty Odd (Shambhala Publications)
  9. Gaiman, NeilFragile Things
  10. Gaiman, Neil – Sandman: Overture (Vertigo Comics)
  11. de Jesus, Noelle Q. and Katigbak-Lacuesta, Mookie (eds.) – Fast Food Fiction Delivery (Anvil Publishing, Inc)
  12. Realuyo, BinoThe Gods We Worship Live Next Door (University of Utah Press)
  13. Malonzo, MervinTabi Po #1 (Visprint, Inc)
  14. Malonzo, Mervin – After Lambana (Vistaprint, Inc)
  15. Chacon, Sasha PimentelInsides She Swallowed (West End Press)
  16. Donoso, Isaac (ed.) Boxer CodexVibal Foundation
  17. Hagedorn, JessicaThe Gangster of Love
  18. Dunbar-Ortiz, RoxanneLoaded (City Lights Books)
  19. Giroux, Henry A.American Nightmare (City Lights Books)
  20. Reyes, Barbara JaneInvocation to Daughters (City Lights Books)
  21. Meltzer, David (eds) – San Francisco Beats: Talking with the Poets (City Lights Books)
  22. Lewis, Penelope and Page, Ra (eds.) – Spindles: Stories from the Science of Sleep (Comma Press)
  23. Depestre, Rene – Hadriana in All My Dreams (Akashic Books)
  24. Bakewell, SarahAt the Existentialist Cafe (Other Press)
  25. Abdurraqib, Hanif – The Can’t Kill Us Until They Kill Us (Two Dollar Radio)
  26. Sax, Sam – Madness
  27. Ferlinghetti, Lawrence – A Coney Island of the Mind, 50th Anniversary Edition (New Directions Press)
  28. Coval, Kevin, Lansana, Quraysh Ali, and Marshall, Nate (eds.) – The Breakbeat Poets (Haymarket Books)

July

  1. Lange, NorahPeople in the Room (And Other Stories)
  2. Apex Magazine #109, June 2018
  3. Hong, XiaoMa Bo’Le’s Second Life (Open Letter Books)
  4. PEN America #21 – Mythologies
  5. Stephenson, Neal and Gallard, Nicole – The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.
  6. Gleason, Rachel – New Kind of Rebellion
  7. Yang, Jy – The Black Tides of Heaven
  8. Yang, Jy – The Read Threads of Fortune
  9. Singh, Vandara – Ambiguity Machines (Small Beer Press)
  10. Erdrich, Heid E (ed.) – New Poets of Native Nations (Graywolf Press)
  11. Womack, Ytasha L. – Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-fi and Fantasy Culture (Lawrence Hill Books)
  12. Goncharov, IvanOblomov
  13. Arendt, HannahThe Origins of Totalitarianism
  14. Poirer, AgnèsLeft Bank

August

  1. Yesenin, Sergei – Selected Poems
  2. Mandelstam, Osip – Voronezh Notebooks (New York Review Books)
  3. Turgenev, Ivan – First Love and Other Stories (Oxford University Press)
  4. Mayakovsky, Vladimir – Selected Poems (Northwestern University Press)
  5. Watts, Peter – The Freeze-Frame Revolution (Tachyon Publishing)
  6. Haight, Ian – Celadon (Unicorn Press)
  7. Roanhorse, Rebecca – Trail of Lightning
  8. Granta #144
  9. Apex Magazine #110
  10. Salvage Magazine #5
  11. Brace, KristinFence, Patio, Blessed Virgin (Finishing Line Press)
  12. Ólafsson, BragiNarrator (Open Letter Books)
  13. Twitty, Michael W. – The Cooking Gene
  14. Bourdain, Anthony – Kitchen Confidential

September

  1. Foglio, Kaja and Foglio, PhilGirl Genius 17: Kings and Wizards (Airship Entertainment)
  2. The Paris Review #226
  3. Amazing Stories 76.1 (Fall 2018/WorldCon Issue)
  4. Rucker, RudyReturn to the Hollow Earth (Transreal Books)
  5. Sagwa, KimMina (Two Lines Press)
  6. Two Lines #29
  7. Ulibarri, Sarena (ed.) – Glass and Gardens: Solarpunk Summers (World Weaver Press)
  8. Trabucco Zerán, AliaThe Remainder (And Other Stories)
  9. Sigurðsson, Ófeigur – Oraefi: The Wasteland (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  10. Llansol, Maria GabrielaThe Geography of Rebels Trilogy (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  11. Berti, EduardoThe Imagined Land (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  12. Matthieussent, BriceRevenge of the Translator (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  13. Jones, Scott R. (ed.) – Cthulhusattva (Martian Migraine Press)
  14. Brenda, Libia (ed.) – A Larger Reality (Cumulo de Tesla)
  15. Ugrešić, DubravkaAmerican Fictionary (Open Letter Books)
  16. Ashton, DyrkPaternus: Wrath of Gods

2017 Reading List

Same as the 2016 reading list. This are all of the books and journals acquired/read by Yours Truly in the 2017 calendar year.

January

  1. Suah, BaeRecitation (Deep Vellum)
  2. Klougart, JosefineOf Darkness (Deep Vellum)
  3. Manson, MarkThe Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck
  4. Blasim, Hassan (ed). – Iraq + 100 (Comma Press UK)
  5. The Long List Anthology vol. 2 (Diabolical Plots LLC)
  6. More, ThomasUtopia
  7. Harrison, JimRepublican Wives (novella)
  8. Žižek, SlavojEvent
  9. Volodine, AntoineRadiant Terminus (Open Letter Books)
  10. Chopra, SerenaIC (Horse Less Press)
  11. Anderson, StephanieLands of Yield (Horse Less Press)

February

  1. Athitakis, MarkThe New Midwest (Belt Publishing)
  2. Atkinson, Scott (ed) – Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  3. Wolin, Sheldon S.Democracy Incorporated
  4. Thompson, Hunter S.Fear and Loathing On the Campaign Trail ’72
  5. Thompson, Hunter S.The Great Shark Hunt
  6. Thompson, Hunter S.Generation of Swine
  7. Thompson, Hunter S.Songs of the Doomed
  8. Thompson, Hunter S.Better Than Sex
  9. Granta #138: Journeys
  10. Du Bois, W.E.B.The Souls of Black Folk (Restless Books)
  11. Weir, AndyThe Martian
  12. Aira, CésarThe Proof (And Other Stories)
  13. Dick, Philip K. – The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick
  14. Noll, João GilbertoAtlantic Hotel (Two Lines Press)
  15. Two Lines, Issue 26
  16. Harrison, JimA Really Big Lunch

March

  1. Eco, UmbertoThe Name of the Rose
  2. Xue, CanFrontier (Open Letter Books)
  3. England, AndreaOther Geographies (Creative Justice Press)
  4. Robinson, Kim StanleyNew York 2140
  5. Hines, Jim C.Revisionary
  6. Sterling, BrucePirate Utopia (Tachyon Publications)
  7. Castillo, AnaPeel My Love Like an Onion
  8. Castillo, AnaBlack Dove (Feminist Press)
  9. Blackburn, PaulThe Collected Poems (Persea Books)
  10. Castillo, AnaWatercolor Women Opaque Men (Northwestern University Press)
  11. Li HeGoddesses, Ghosts and Demons: The Collected Poems of Li He
  12. Kicknosway, FayeWho Shall Know Them?
  13. Vallejo, CésarPoemas Humanos

April

  1. Condrescu, AndreiAlien Candor (Black Sparrow Press)
  2. Cope, David (ed) – Song of the Owashtanong (Ridgeway Press)
  3. May, JamaalHum (Alice James Books)
  4. Wright, C.D.The Poet, the Lion, Talking Pictures, El Farolito, a Wedding in St. Roch, the Big Box Store, the Warp in the Mirror, Spring, Midnights, Fire & All (Copper Canyon Press)
  5. Poetry Magazine, April 2017
  6. Pitol, SergioThe Magician of Vienna (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  7. Gnarr, JónThe Outlaw (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  8. Adams, John Joseph (ed.) – Cosmic Powers
  9. Conversations with Paul Bowles (University Press of Mississippi)
  10. Conversations with Chinua Achebe (University Press of Mississippi)
  11. Patterson, Jorge ZepedaMilena, or The Most Beautiful Femur in the World (Restless Books)
  12. Fresán, RodrigoThe Invented Part (Open Letter Books)
  13. Garréta, AnneNot One Day (Deep Vellum Publishing)

May

  1. VanderMeer, JeffBorne
  2. Springer, FilipHistory of a Disappearance (Restless Books)
  3. Jaeggy, FleurI Am the Brother of XX (And Other Stories)
  4. Segaloff, NatA Lit Fuse: The Provocative Life of Harlan Ellison (NESFA Press) #165 of 500
  5. Dostoevsky, FyodorCrime and Punishment
  6. Dostoevsky, FyodorDemons
  7. Jussawalla, Feroza and Dasenbrock, Reed Way (eds) – Interviews with Writers of the Post-Colonial World (University Press of Mississippi)
  8. Granta #139
  9. Miéville, ChinaOctober
  10. James, D.R.Split Level (Finishing Line Press)
  11. McGookey, KathleenHeart in a Jar (White Pine Press)

June

  1. Carroll, JimLiving at the Movies
  2. Rulfo, JuanThe Golden Cockerel & Other Writings (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  3. Nowicki, WojciechSalki (Open Letter Books)
  4. Glossolalia, Issue 3
  5. Jodorowsky, AlejandroWhere the Bird Sings Best (Restless Books)
  6. Martin, George R.R.The World of Ice and Fire
  7. Hopler, JayThe Abridged History of Rainfall (McSweeney’s)
  8. Walsh, JoannaWorlds from the Word’s End (And Other Stories)
  9. Laurel, Juan Tomás ÁvilaThe Gurugu Pledge (And Other Stories)
  10. NDiaye, MarieMy Heart Hemmed In (Two Lines Press)
  11. The 3288 Review, Issue 2.4 (Caffeinated Press)

July

  1. Schafer, William (ed.) – Best of Subterranean (Subterranean Press)
  2. Alexie, ShermanThe Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven
  3. Alexie, ShermanReservation Blues
  4. Alexie, ShermanYou Don’t Have to Say You Love Me
  5. Oliver, MaryWhy I Wake Early
  6. Open Palm Print #7
  7. Eggers, DaveZeitoun
  8. Hammond, Rose L. – Just a Poor Country Girl (Run With It)
  9. LeBel, SteveThe Universe Builders: Bernie and the Lost Girl (Argon Press)
  10. LeBel, SteveThe Universe Builders: Bernie and the Putty (Argon Press)
  11. Davis, JeanThe Last God
  12. McClure, Patricia M.Losing a Hero to Alzheimer’s
  13. Payne, J. ScottThe Green Hell (Argon Press)
  14. Compton, Deanna J.Freecurrent: The Legacy (In God’s Hands Publishing)
  15. The Best of McSweeney’s (McSweeney’s)
  16. Torres, FernandaThe End (Restless Books)
  17. Bergsson, Guðbergur – Tómas Jónsson, Bestseller (Open Letter Books)

August

  1. Dickie, TenzinOld Demons, New Deities (O/R Books)
  2. Carroll, JonathanThe Crow’s Dinner (Subterranean Press)
  3. Sterling, BruceHeavy Weather
  4. Sterling, BruceGlobalhead
  5. Russell, Mary DoriaThe Sparrow
  6. Blas de Roblès, Jean-MarieIsland of Point Nemo (Open Letter Books)
  7. Kenny, TimothyFar Country (Bottom Dog Press)
  8. Steadman, RalphExtinct Boids
  9. Steadman, RalphNextinction
  10. Shrestha, RomioGoddesses of the Celestial Gallery (Mandala Publishing)
  11. YossA Planet for Rent (Restless Books)

September

  1. Hernández, CarlosThe Assimilated Cuban’s Guide to Quantum Santeria (Rosarium Publishing)
  2. Merwin, W.S.The Shadow of Sirius (Copper Canyon Press)
  3. Merwin, W.S.The Essential W.S. Merwin (Copper Canyon Press)
  4. Two Lines, issue 27
  5. The Paris Review, issue 222
  6. Powers, TimMedusa’s Web; signed #462 of 474 (Subterranean Press)
  7. Gallagher, StephenThe Authentic William James; signed #279 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  8. Carroll, JonathanThe Crow’s Dinner; signed #312 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  9. Egan, GregThe Four Thousand, the Eight Hundred; signed #669 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  10. Grant, MiraFinal Girls; signed #1161 of 1250 (Subterranean Press)
  11. Bujold, Lois McMasterPenric and the Shaman  (Subterranean Press)
  12. Kiernan, Caitlin R.Dear Sweet Filthy World (Subterranean Press)
  13. Resnick, MikeVoyages; signed #911 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  14. Reynolds, AlastairBeyond the Aquila Rift (Subterranean Press)
  15. Shepard, LuciusFive Autobiographies and a Fiction (Subterranean Press)
  16. Silverberg, RobertEarly Days; signed #626 of 1000 (Subterranean Press)
  17. Pugliese, NicolaMalacqua (And Other Stories)
  18. Boullosa, CarmenHeavens on Earth (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  19. Lahens, YanickMoonbath (Deep Vellum Publishing)
  20. Brandt, Per AageIf I Were a Suicide Bomber (Open Letter Books)

October

  1. Suah, BaehNorth Station (Open Letter Books)
  2. Neruda, PabloBook of Twilight (Copper Canyon Press)
  3. Chamoiseau, PatrickTexaco
  4. Bishop, K.J.The Etched City
  5. Akhmatova, AnnaSelected Poems
  6. Navarro, ElviraA Working Woman (Two Lines Press)
  7. Unnikrishnan, DeepakTemporary People (Restless Books)
  8. Cruz, Victor HernandezRed Beans (Coffee House Press)
  9. Michigan Quarterly, vol. 56 No. 2
  10. McSweeney’s #50
  11. Jemisen, N.K.The Fifth Season
  12. VanderMeer, JeffAnnihilation
  13. Oomen, Anne-MariePulling Down the Barn (Wayne State University Press)
  14. Cooper, WynPostcards from the Interior (BOA Editions, Ltd.)
  15. Cooper, WynChaos is the new Calm (BOA Editions, Ltd.)
  16. Holden, CraigThe Jazz Bird
  17. The Sutra of Hui Neng (H.K. Buddhist Book Distributor)
  18. Dobbs, David & Ober, RichardThe Northern Forest
  19. Watts, AlanPsychotherapy East & West
  20. Kapleau, PhilipThe Three Pillars of Zen
  21. Lopez, Donald S. (ed.) – Religions of Tibet in Practice
  22. Baghramian, Maria (ed.) – Modern Philosophy of Language
  23. Liu, Ken (ed.) – Invisible Planets
  24. Ward, JesmynSing, Unburied, Sing
  25. Schnurr, RyanIn the Watershed (Belt Publishing)
  26. McLelland, EdwardHow to Speak Midwestern (Belt Publishing)
  27. Nickels, Ashley and Vilella, Dani (eds) – Grand Rapids Grassroots: An Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  28. Sedegy, Jason (ed.) The Akron Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  29. Cleveland Neighborhood Guidebook (Belt Publishing)
  30. Piiparinen, Richey and Trubek, Anne (eds.) – The Cleveland Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  31. Atkinson, Scott (ed.) – Happy Anyway: A Flint Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  32. Boyd, Eric (ed.) – The Pittsburgh Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  33. Clark, Anna (ed.) – A Detroit Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  34. Foley, AaronThe Detroit Neighborhood Guidebook (Belt Publishing)
  35. Foley, AaronHow to Live In Detroit Without Being a Jackass (Belt Publishing)
  36. Bayne, Martha (ed.) – Rust Belt Chicago: An Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  37. McQuade, Zan (ed.) – The Cincinnati Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  38. Biehl, Jody K. (ed.) – Right Here, Right Now: The Buffalo Anthology (Belt Publishing)
  39. Marino, Jacqueline and Miller, Will (eds.) – Car Bombs to Cookie Tables: The Youngstown Anthology (Belt Publishing)

November

  1. Abani, ChrisThe Face: Cartography of the Void (Restless Books)
  2. Piglia, RicardoThe Diaries of Emilio Renzi, Formative Years (Restless Books)
  3. Keni, NiyatiEsperanza Street (And Other Stories)
  4. Quin, AnnThe Unmapped Country (And Other Stories)
  5. McDermott, John J (ed). – The Writings of William James (University of Chicago Press)
  6. McPhee, JohnDraft No. 4
  7. Subterranean Press Bibliography 1995 – 2015 (Subterranean Press)
  8. Hilbig, WolfgangOld Rendering Plant (Two Lines Press)
  9. Nielsen, JoanesThe Brahmadells (Open Letter Books)
  10. Diaz, Junot (ed.) – Global Dystopias (Boston Review)
  11. Long List Anthology vol. I
  12. McClung, Laren (ed.) – Inheriting the War
  13. Stoppard, TomPlays 5

December

  1. NaivoBeyond the Rice Fields (Restless Books)
  2. Silveira, Maria JoseHer Mother’s Mother’s Mother and Her Daughters (Open Letter Books)
  3. McSweeney’s #51